Politics

Miriam Ross

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“Seasoned. Experienced. Trusted.” These are the traits that Miriam Ross believes differentiate her from the competition. Out of the three candidates she is the most knowledgeable when it comes to working with businesses, both as an in-house attorney at multinational corporations like GTECH - where she was involved in drafting ethics policies (among others) - and as an owner of her own law firm where she represents small business clients. She also teaches a number of courses at RWU School of Law specifically dealing with business, politics and ethics.

Ross knows that we need to attract new business to the state, which in turn, creates jobs, revitalizes our economy and boosts our nation-wide image. She believes that one way to achieve this goal is to establish a better regulatory system regarding the convoluted application process businesses have to navigate when applying for permits – something she is intimately familiar with as a chair on the RI Small Business Economic Summit.

In terms of education, Ross explains that we need to take a deep look at the state funding formula and reassess where our resources are actually going. While sitting in her office on Elmgrove Ave, Ross states, “I will get Providence and District 4 its appropriate share of state aid through the formula.” She is not a proponent of the current system of standardized testing, but she does concede that assessments, when used as a constructive measure and not as a punitive one, are necessary when determining achievement and success within schools.

Ross is also the most vocal when it comes to investing in alternative means of higher education; she explains that college is not everyone’s first choice and that its imperative to our state’s economy that we invest more in curricula that foster learning in “para-professional” and industry-specific jobs.

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